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The New [New] Corpse, Installation view, Sector 2337, 2014.

The New [New] Corpse, Installation view, Sector 2337, 2014.

From Wed – Sat, between the hours of 2 and 6pm we will have our doors open at 2337 N Milwaukee Ave. We got our liquor license officially as well, which means you can come by the space for a drink, peruse our bookshelf, look at the group show we have up, or just catch up. The Sector 2337 website is live as well. That is where we will continue posting blog items, while publishing news of our upcoming events, and book reviews.

And, if you’re interested — Paul Crisanti took some great pictures at our first ever opening this last Thursday. Check those out here.

The New [New] Corpse: Opens October 16

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Detail of “Aggregate Body,” Young Joon Kwak, 2013. 89 x 44″, Archival inkjet print. Courtesy of Artist.

  

The New [New] Corpse

October 16 – December 11, 2014

Opening on Oct 16 from 7-9pm

This exhibit is part of Chicago Artists Month.

Featuring Benjamin L. Aman & Marion Auburtin, Joseph Grigely, Young Joon Kwak, Jason Lazarus, Carlos Martiel, Heather Mekkelson, Aay Preston-Myint, Rachel Niffenegger, Xaviera Simmons, Shane Ward, and Shoshanna Weinberger;

& The Dead Weight Performance Series 
October 09 @7:30 (doors open at 7pm):
Jesse Malmed & Carlos Martiel
December 18 @ 7:30 (doors open at 7pm):
Amelia Charter & Jefferson Pinder

Co-curated by Every house has a door The Green Lantern Press

with Jane Jerardi as our November Studio Resident.

Chicago — For its inaugural exhibition, Sector 2337 presents The New [New] Corpse, a group show curated and produced by The Green Lantern Press with thirteen artists whose work in photography, sculpture, performance, film, and drawing wrestles with representation to show how the figure appears fragmented, distorted, or emphatically absent. These artists exhume the human body to study the material networks by which it is comprised. Xaviera Simmons presents the figure fragmented in the pages of an open book. French artists Benjamin L. Aman and Marion Auburtin present ceramic music boxes that turn like grotesque curiosities. Recent Whitney Biennial participant Joseph Grigely offers expired New York Timesclippings with the figure frozen and silent mid-song. Heather Mekkelson includes the material excerpts of human activity and Rachel Niffenegger installs a field of debris and faded scrims. Shoshanna Weinberger and Young Joon Kwak each explore an estranged and modified body, while Jason Lazarus photographs a blurred chair, emphasizing the body’s absence. Throughout each of these portrayals, representation is skewed, and unfixed — as copies of images in flux, emerging in foreign mediums that themselves have material properties: metal, cake, photography, facsimile, dust. Shane Ward’s sculpture is a deteriorated cast of a Roman artifact, and Aay Preston-Myint installs an edible homage to utopic ideals. Within this constellation of works, a postulate emerges: the human figure is no longer defined by stable boundaries, but is rather embedded in a network of fluctuating nonhuman parts.

 

BIOGRAPHIES

 

Benjamin L. Aman (b.1981, Rouen, France; Lives and works in Berlin). Currently in residency at La Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris, Benjamin Laurent Aman is a sound and visual artist whose work oscillates between drawing, sculpture and sound, most frequently echoing each other and flowing from a range of perceptions that combine a physical, mental and emotional approach. Using techniques of collage and spatial shifts, Aman’s constructions invite the public to travel through undetermined, local zones, where reflections and life are organized. Since 2005, Aman’s work has been exhibited in numerous group exhibitions (Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, CAC Nei Liicht Luxembourg, Selasar Sunaryo Museum Bandung, Space London) and dedicated ones (Styx Projects, Able Kulturverein, Atelier KSR in Berlin, Kunstraum Michael Barthel in Leipzig). Since 2007, Aman has carried out many sound performances all over Europe. He has been invited to festivals and radio shows (Epsilonia in Paris, Le tétraèdre in Bruxelles, The Wire on Air, Resonance FM in London…) and performed at the 10th Berlin Biennale, Transmediale X, Club Transmediale (CTM) and Nu Substance Indonesia amongst others. In 2009, Aman founded the Razzle Dazzle label, where he publishes items related to fine arts and sound.

Marion Auburtin (b. 1978, France) During the past 10 years, Auburtin has focused on painting miniatures, following a long and meticulous process of work with a maniac and distant approach. Recalling early Renaissance masters, still life, anatomical studies or film noirs images, Auburtin produces objects and paintings that toy with reversible feelings like seduction and repulsion, training and perfection, luxury and death, beauty and deformity, etc. Having graduated from ENSA Nancy (Fine Arts Academy of Nancy), she lives and works in Berlin and Paris, and currently resides at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris. She has taken part in numerous exhibitions and projects in Europe like Evil Clowns (HMKV Dortmund), Perturbations(Musée Fabre Montpellier), Sleep Disorders (Nei Liicht Contemporary Art Center Luxembourg), Légère éclaircie (Galerie White Project, Paris), Equinox (Grimmuseum Berlin)… She ‘s been supported by the French Art Council twice and her work is part of several collections including: The Colas Fondation, Ravini­Bourriaud, Corréard, and Vidal. She has been selected for Le Prix Novembre de Vitry and Le Salon de Montrouge (Paris), and has had solo shows in Germany (Total gallery Berlin, Able gallery Berlin), Luxembourg (Dominique LangContemporary Art Center Luxembourg) and France (Galerie 9 Nancy).

Joseph Grigely is an artist and critical theorist. His exhibitions include solo shows at the Musée d’art Moderne in Paris; The Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin; The Whitney Museum of American Art; and the MCA, Chicago. His group shows include the Whitney, Venice, Berlin, Istanbul and Sydney Biennials. He is represented by Gallery Air de Paris, Paris.

Young Joon Kwak (b. 1984) is an LA-based artist and performer. She has had solo exhibitions in Chicago and LA, most recently at Commonwealth and Council (LA) in September 2014.  She performs in the band Xina Xurner, and is co-founder of Mutant Salon. Kwak received her MFA from USC Roski School of Art & Design, MA from the University of Chicago, and BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Jason Lazarus (b. 1975) is a Chicago based artist, curator, writer, and educator–he is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the School of the Art Institute, Chicago, IL. Lazarus’ work has recently been examined by Michelle Grabner (monograph published by University Galleries of Illinois State University), Abigail Solomon-Godeau (monograph published by SF Camerawok), Shane Lavalette (monograph published by Light Work), Lori Waxman (Art Forum), and Carmen Winant (Frieze Magazine).  Major exhibitions include Black Is, Black Ain’t at the Renaissance Society, Love to Love You at MASS MoCA, On the Scene at the Art Institute of Chicago, Not the Way You Remembered at the Queens Museum of Art,Image Search at PPOW Gallery in NYC, and Michael Jackson Doesn’t Quit, Part 3 at the Future Gallery, Berlin. Recent solo exhibitions include Jason Lazarus: Chicago Works at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Live Archive at the Contemporary Jewish Museum in San Francisco, and THTK (Toronto) at Gallery TPW in Toronto, CA.  In 2016, Lazarus is commissioned to mount a site-specific vernacular photography installation for the re-opening of SF MOMA’s Photography Wing, this installation will become part of the SF MOMA permanent collection. Jason is a Co-Founder and Co-Editor of Chicago Artist Writers, an online art criticism platform that asks artists and art workers to write traditional and experimental criticism that serves non-profit, temporary, and alternative arts programming in Chicago. Throughout 2014, he will be screening internationally a feature length film comprised entirely of animated GIFS called twohundredfiftysixcolors, a collaboration with Eric Fleischauer.

Carlos Martiel (b. Havana) is a controversial Cuban artist specializing in performance. His works focus on specific political events and on social injustices that occur inside and outside his country of origin. Martiel’s performances reflect on the relations of power between the individual and the different contexts in which he or she operates. He graduated from the National Academy of Fine Arts “San Alejandro,” Havana in 2009. Between the years of 2008-2010, he studied in the Catedra de Arte Conducta, directed by the artist Tania Bruguera. Martiel’s works have been included in: Havana Biennial (2009), Pontevedra Biennal (2010), Liverpool Biennial ( 2010), Biennial “La Otra,” Bogotá ( 2013); International Performance Art Biennale, Houston,(2014). He has had solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Center “Wifredo Lam,” Havana (2012); Nitsch Museum, Naples (2013); Axeneo 7, Montreal (2013); Lux Gallery, Guatemala City (2013); and Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles (2014). He has received several awards, including “CIFOS Grants & Commissions Program Award” in Miami, 2014; “Arte Laguna” in Venice, Italy, 2013; “Close Up Award” in Vallarta, Mexico, 2012. His work has been exhibited in Estonian Museum of Art and Design in Tallinn, Estonia; Museum of Modern Art of Buenos Aires in Argentina; Bellevue Museum of Arts, Washington; The 8th floor in New York, Arocena Museum in Mexico, among others

Heather Mekkelson lives and works in Chicago. Solo and two-person exhibitions include Now Slices at 65GRAND, Invisible Apocalypse at Roots & Culture; Heather Mekkelson at +medicine cabinet; Limited Entry at Old Gold; Debris Field at Threewalls; and Out Land at STANDARD (all Chicago, IL.) Her work has also been in group shows at INOVA (Milwaukee, WI), The Museum of Contemporary Photography (Chicago, IL), The Figge Art Museum (Davenport, IA), The Poor Farm (Manawa, WI), Raid Projects (Los Angeles, CA), and Vox Populi (Philadelphia, PA). Mekkelson’s work has been written about in Art Journal, Broadsheet, Time Out Chicago, New City, Chicago Tribune, Artforum.com and others. In 2012 she became an Artadia Award Chicago awardee. Mekkelson is represented in Chicago by 65GRAND.

Aay Preston-Myint is an artist, printmaker, and educator based in Chicago, IL. His practice currently employs visual and collaborative strategies to investigate memory, memorial, self-reflection and self-projection within the context of queer community and history. In addition to his own work in interdisciplinary media, he is a founder of No Coast, an artist partnership that prints and distributes affordable contemporary artwork, serves as a DJ and organizer for Chances Dances, a party that supports and showcases the work of queer artists in Chicago, and is editor-in-chief of an online and print journal called Monsters and Dust.

Rachel Niffenegger recently returned to United States after a residency at De Ateliers in Amsterdam. While in Europe, she presented a solo show at Club Midnightin Berlin and was included in group shows at Museum for Modern Art in Arnhem and Bourouina Gallery in Berlin. She has been included in group shows at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, Tracy Williams Ltd in NYC , Asya Geisberg in NYC, Ceri Hand Gallery in Liverpool, and in Chicago at Western Exhibitions  Corbett vs. Dempsey, Andrew Rafacz Gallery and the Hyde Park Art Center. Chicago Magazinenamed her “Chicago’s Best Emerging Artist” in 2010 and New City named her one of “Chicago’s Next Generation of Image Makers” in 2010. Niffenegger, born in Evanston in 1985, received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her MFA from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois in 2012.

Xaviera Simmons received her BFA from Bard College (2004) after spending two years on a walking pilgrimage retracing the transatlantic slave trade with Buddhist monks. She completed the Whitney Museum’s Independent Study Program in Studio Art (2005) while simultaneously completing a two year actor-training conservatory with The Maggie Flanigan Studio. Simmons has exhibited nationally and internationally where major exhibitions and performances include: The Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1, The Studio Museum in Harlem, The Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, The Public Art Fund, and The Sculpture Center. Selected solo and group exhibitions for 2013–2014 include Archive As Impetus at The Museum Of Modern Art; Underscore at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum; Open at David Castillo Gallery; Rehearsals at The Savannah College Of Art and Design; andRadical Presence at The Studio Museum In Harlem among many others. Her works are in major museum and private collections including Deutsche Bank, UBS, The Guggenheim Museum, The Agnes Gund Art Collection, The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, The Studio Museum in Harlem, MOCA Miami, and Perez Art Museum Miami.

Shane Ward (b. 1985) is an American artist who lives and works in Chicago. Ward’s work is dedicated to themes of war and romance, capital and masculinity, violence and emancipation, surface luster and value. Ward is after the relationship between the grave and the monument, the mine and jewelry box, the wound and the mend. Of late, he has thought of this as a sustained inquiry into the nature of victory, its relationship to liberty, and its ultimate fragility. Ward earned his MFA from the University of Chicago in 2012 and received the Claire Rosen & Samuel Edes Foundation Prize for Emerging Artists in 2013. He currently teaches in the Sculpture Department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Shoshanna Weinberger Born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1973 to a Jamaican-mother and American-father, Shoshanna was raised in Montclair, NJ. She currently lives and works in Newark, NJ. Her work has shown for the past decade nationally and internationally featured in group shows: The New Authentics (Spertus Museum, Chicago, IL); New American Talent 18 (The Jones Center for Contemporary Art, Austin, TX); Acts of Alterity (Nomad Gallery, Brussels, Belgium); Empire (Five Myles, Brooklyn, NY); All That Glitters (The Gateway Project, Newark); Mutations (Tiwani Contemporary, London, England); America Through Artists’ Eyes (NJ State Museum, Trenton). Solo shows include: What Makes My Hottentot So Hot (Solos Project House, Newark, 2012); Sometimes All of Me is Not Enough (Carol Jazzar Contemporary Art, Miami, 2012); Potbelly Pin-Ups: Out of Many One (Woman Made Gallery, Chicago, 2014). She has also been featured in the National Gallery of Jamaica, 2012 Biennial, Kingston, JA and BIAC Martinique 2013 Biennial, French West Indies. Weinberger was featured in the Nov/Dec 2012 issue of Art Papers and awarded the First Prize in the 34th Bradley International Print and Drawing Exhibition, Bradley University, Peoria, IL (2013). Her work has been acquired by public collections: The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ; The Sagamore Collection, Miami; Girls Club Collection, Ft. Lauderdale and The Margulies Collection, Miami. Weinberger holds a BFA degree from The School of the Institute of Art in Chicago, 1995; and received a MFA degree from Yale School of Art, Yale University, 2003.

 

Founded in 2005, The Green Lantern Press is an artist-run, non-profit press focused on emerging or forgotten texts in order to bridge contemporary experience with historical form. Head quartered at Sector 2337, the press produces contemporary art exhibitions and unique print publications that are noncommercial in nature. We celebrate the integration of artistic mediums. We celebrate the amateur, the idealist and those who recognize the importance of small independent practice. In a cultural climate where the humanities must often defend themselves, we provide intimate examples of creative thought.

Sector 2337 is a storefront gallery and bookstore opening this October at 2337 N Milwaukee Avenue. Functioning as Head Quarters for The Green Lantern Press, Sector 2337 will host three exhibitions a year, maintain a vibrant schedule of public programs, as well as a niche on-line bookstore and an in-store bookshelf specializing in contemporary art, poetry, theory, and independent press titles. By marrying these threads — contemporary exhibitions, readings, performances, poetry, and printed matter — we continue the spirit of The Green Lantern Gallery and Press, making community, culture, and discourse easily accessible to Chicago.

 ________________________________________________________
ABOUT OUR NOVEMBER RESIDENT:Jane Jerardi is a time-based artist working in the media of choreography, performance, and video.  She has created work for a variety of contexts –- from theaters and galleries to record store listening booths, public subway escalators, audio walks, and projected videos –- constructing pieces that often move fluidly between media. A frequent collaborator, she has been fortunate to work with performers Heeran Lee, Ginger Wagg, Brian Buck and Maré Hieronimus; musicians Amy Farina (of The Evens), Scanner (aka Robin Rimbaud) and Lucas Zarwell; and artists Michael Wichita and Agata Olek, among many others, on her projects.  Her work has been presented by spaces such as 6018North, Defibrillator Performance Gallery and Links Hall (Chicago): the Joyce Soho, Danspace Project at St. Mark’s Church, the LUMEN Festival (in New York); and at Transformer, The Warehouse, Dance Place, and the Kennedy Center (in Washington, DC), as well as other venues.  She has been fortunate to receive support from the Creative Communities Fund of the National Captial Region as well as support from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities through its Artist Fellowship, Young Emerging Artist, and New Media awards. She holds a MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Performance and a BA from Hampshire College in Amherst, MA, where she studied choreography and cultural studies.  She is currently on faculty and staff at The Dance Center at Columbia College, Chicago.
 ________________________________________________________
& FROM THE WORLD OF PRINTED MATTER: 
Now available on SPD: Poor Farm Press & The Green Lantern Press bring you MOTHERNISM by Lise Haller Baggesen: “From cleavage to cobras to cherry popping, MOTHERNISM is both a contemplation and call to action vis-á-vis the position and shape of the MOTHER in contemporary art and culture.”
— Jennifer Reeder

Mothernism Book Release and Installation

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Psyched that Lise Haller Baggesen Ross‘s book is finally officially in the world. Come celebrate the text and her affiliated installation at Ordinary Projects this Saturday. Think Disco + Future Feminisms +LuvandHoles

It is also available for purchase at last on SPD!

Mothernism, Saturday 10/4 at Ordinary Projects :: 2233 S Throop St, 5th Fl, Chicago, Illinois 60608

Cocktail Reception 5pm-9pm
Readings by Lise Haller Baggesen 5:30pm and 7:30pm,
(signed copies available for sale)

At the intersection of feminism, science fiction, and disco, Mothernism aims to locate the mother-shaped hole in contemporary art discourse. If the proverbial Mother is perhaps perceived as a persona non grata in the art world, because her nurturing nature is at odds with the hyperbolic ideal of the singular artistic genius, Mothernism amplifies her presence, channeling her energy, complexity, and sublime creative potential in a series of intimate and critical reflections.

The installation at Ordinary Projects includes audio of the artist’s text, a collection of letters — dedicated with love from one mother to her dear daughter, sister, mother, and reader — fusing biography, music, art, and history into an auto-theoretical testimony that recalls and redefines the future imperfect.

About the Author: Lise Haller Baggesen (1969) left her native Denmark for the Netherlands in 1992, to study painting at the Academy of Art and Industrial Design in Enschede and the Rijksacademy in Amsterdam. In 2008, she relocated with her family to Chicago, where she graduated from the School of the Art Institute in 2013 with an MA in Visual and Critical Studies. Over time, her painting practice evolved into a hybrid production, including teaching, curating, writing, and multimedia installation work.
She has shown internationally in galleries and museums including Overgaden in Copenhagen, the Municipial Museum in the Hague, MoMu in Antwerp, Wurttembergischem Kunstverein in Stuttgart, CAEC in Xiamen, The Poor Farm in Manawa, Wisconsin, 6018 North, Chicago and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago.

The Dead Weight Performance Series

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Screen Shot 2014-10-01 at 8.25.46 AMOctober 09, 2014 @ 7:30pm : Jesse Malmed & Carlos Martiel (doors open @ 7pm)

December 18, 2014 @ 7:30: Jefferson Pinder & Amelia Charter (doors open @ 7pm)

The former Green Lantern Gallery is reopening as Sector 2337 in a store front in Logan Square. A group exhibition, The New [New] Corpse opens on October 16th. Next Thursday, however, we will kick things off with a new performance series co-curated and produced by Every house has a door and The Green Lantern Press, featuring Jesse Malmed, Carlos Martiel, Jefferson Pinder, and Amelia Charter. The event is free and ADA accessible. Come join us!

The Dead Weight Performance Series

featuring Jesse Malmed, Carlos Martiel, Jefferson Pinder, & Amelia Charter

CHICAGO, 2014 — The Dead Weight Performance Series will present two evenings of performance by four invited artists, bookending the inaugural exhibition group show The New [New] Corpse, at Sector 2337. The exhibition regards a return to the figure. This trend echoes the earlier “crisis of the figure” theme in representational painting, while also resonating with newer questions of posthumanism, capitalist critiques, and the transformation of hierarchies, precipitating a “return” of a figure that seems distorted, grotesque, modified, or emphatically absent.The performance series, in conversation with the exhibit, considers the human as a non-human event. Philosopher Isabelle Stengers defines humans as “those whose souls are moved by the erotic power of Ideas. What makes us human is not ours: it is the relation we are able to entertain with something that is not our creation.” An Idea, writes Stengers, causes us to “think, feel, and hesitate.” The word cause does not imply a simple formula of cause and effect. Rather the nonhuman element (Idea), accessed by way of a practice, engenders the thinking, feeling, and hesitation that define us as human to and for ourselves. In the sense that these nonhuman elements can be said to, as apprehensions, inhere “inside” the human body, we propose the theme of the human as nonhuman event. Conversely, the body, like an anti-Idea, at times becomes as a physical encumbrance, what Emerson called the giant I always take with me. Performance, like the body in this formulation, may carry a similar weight of responsibility, often seeming to be more trouble than it’s worth – maximal effort for minimal returns – but inescapable. The law of the body is the law, like the law of gravity. If the human can be considered a nonhuman event, is the weight of performance living or dead? Does it oscillate between the poles of animate and inanimate? How will these four artists reveal that oscillation as apparent, visible, necessary, and performable?

 

OCTOBER ARTISTS

Jesse Malmed is an artist and curator working in video, performance, text, occasional objects and their gaps and overlaps. His various pre-occupations include: Choir Conductor, Loveable Slouch, Paranoiac Research Assistant, Comic Concierge, Junk Shop Salesman, Re-Titler, Poet-Comedian, Traffic Caller, Bootlegger, Idiot’s Idiot, Infinite Gesticulator, Pro Bono Closed Captioner and Imaginary Television Host. He has performed, screened and exhibited at museums, microcinemas, film festivals, galleries, bars and barns, including the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Portland Art Museum’s Northwest Film Center, Light Industry, the Shanghai Biennial, Crossroads, Milwaukee Underground Film Festival and Chicago Underground Film Festival. In addition to his own work, Jesse programs at the Nightingale Cinema, co-directs the mobile exhibition space and artist bumper sticker project Trunk Show and has programmed work in a wide variety of contexts individually, as a member of Cinema Project and as the peripatetic Deep Leap Microcinema. His writing has appeared in Incite Journal, YA5, OMNI Reboot, Big Big Wednesday, Temporary Art Review, Bad at Sports and Cine-File. A native of Santa Fe, Jesse earned his BA at Bard College and his MFA at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He was named a “2014 Breakout Artist” by Newcity and is a 2014-15 Artistic Associate at Links Hall.

Carlos Martiel (born in Havana) is a controversial Cuban artist specializing in performance. His works focus on specific political events and on social injustices that occurr inside and outside his country of origin. Martiel’s performances reflect on the relations of power between the individual and the different contexts in which he or she operates. He graduated from the National Academy of Fine Arts “San Alejandro,” Havana in 2009. Between the years of 2008-2010, he studied in the Catedra de Arte Conducta, directed by the artist Tania Bruguera. Martiel’s works have been included in: Havana Biennial (2009), Pontevedra Biennal (2010), Liverpool Biennial ( 2010), Biennial “La Otra,” Bogotá ( 2013); International Performance Art Biennale, Houston,(2014). He has had solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Center “Wifredo Lam,” Havana (2012); Nitsch Museum, Naples (2013); Axeneo 7, Montreal (2013); Lux Gallery, Guatemala City (2013); and Steve Turner Contemporary, Los Angeles (2014). He has received several awards, including “CIFOS Grants & Commissions Program Award” in Miami, 2014; “Arte Laguna” in Venice, Italy, 2013; “Close Up Award” in Vallarta, Mexico, 2012. His work has been exhibited in Estonian Museum of Art and Design in Tallinn, Estonia; Museum of Modern Art of Buenos Aires in Argentina; Bellevue Museum of Arts, Washington; The 8th floor in New York, Arocena Museum in Mexico, among others

 

DECEMBER ARTISTS 

Amelia Charter is a performance artist, teacher, and writer. Her interdisciplinary practice cultivates a bridge suspended between human presence, matter, and site. Her performances arrive out of embodiment investigations, body-mind practices, improvisation, sculptural configurations, and experimental writing. Her garments, furniture and installations hybridize functional and poetic qualities, bringing multiple meanings to everyday objects through sonic and tactile play. Her work often concerns motherliness, disobedience, dwelling, and the utilitarian. Charter regularly performs one-on-one, and both her solo and collaborative work has been featured at Defibrillator Gallery, Mana Contemporary, Co-Prosperity Sphere, with Second-Floor Rear, and at the Bits and Pieces monthly Salon in Chicago, and in artist-run organizations and larger curations in New York, Philadelphia, Denver and internationally in India. She earned her BA in Performance and Directing, was co-founder of Denver Performance Research, and received an MFA and fellowship in Performance from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Charter is currently working with artists KJ Holmes, Precious Jennings, and Elizabeth Watt, and is a sponsored artist this fall at Links Hall. She also offers private creative restorative sessions, and for over four years has coordinated a movement improvisation laboratory.

Jefferson Pinder, a Chicago based video/performance artist, seeks to find identity through the most dynamic circumstances. His experimental videos and films feature minimal performances that reference music videos and physical theatre. Pinder’s work provides personal and social commentary in accessible and familiar format. Inspired by soundtracks, he utilizes hypnotic popular music and surreal performances to underscore themes dealing with Afro-Futurism, physical endurance and blackness.

His work has been featured in numerous group and solo shows including exhibitions at The Studio Museum in Harlem, the Wadsworth Athenaeum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut, Showroom Mama in Rotterdam, Netherlands, The High Museum in Atlanta and the Zacheta National Gallery in Warsaw, Poland. Pinder’s work was featured at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery exhibition Recognize. In the spring of 2012 his action packed endurance performance Ben-Hur was featured at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Most recently he’s been grappling with segregation and music in Alabama with a large ensemble performance titled Belly of the Beast in downtown Birmingham, a commission sponsored by The Birmingham Museum of Art.

Jefferson received his BA in Theatre from the University of Maryland, and studied at the Asolo Theatre Conservatory in Sarasota, FL. In 2001, Jefferson returned to the University of Maryland to receive his MFA in Mixed Media. Currently he is an Associate Professor in the Contemporary Practices department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

PRODUCERS

Every house has a door was formed in 2008 by Lin Hixson, director, and Matthew Goulish, dramaturge, to convene project-specific teams of specialists, including emerging as well as internationally recognized artists. Drawn to historically or critically neglected subjects, Every house creates performances in which the subject remains largely absented from the finished work. The performances distill and separate presentational elements into distinct modes – recitation, installation, movement, music – to grant each its own space and time, and inviting the viewer to assemble the parts in duration, after the fact of the performance, to rediscover the missing subject. Works include Let us think of these  things always. Let us speak of them never. (2009) in response to the work of Yugoslavian filmmaker Dušan Makavejev, Testimonium (2013) a collaboration with the band Joan of Arc in response to Charles Reznikoff’s Testimony poems, and the on-going project 9 Beginnings based on local performance archives. In 2014, Hixson and Goulish shared a Foundation for Contemporary Arts fellowship in recognition of their work with Every house, and expanded their mission to include curation.

Founded in 2005, The Green Lantern Press is an artist-run, non-profit press focused on emerging or forgotten texts in order to bridge contemporary experience with historical form. Head quartered at Sector 2337, the press produces contemporary art exhibitions and unique print publications that are noncommercial in nature. We celebrate the integration of artistic mediums. We celebrate the amateur, the idealist and those who recognize the importance of small independent practice. In a cultural climate where the humanities must often defend themselves, we provide intimate examples of creative thought.

Sector 2337 is a storefront gallery and bookstore opening this October at 2337 N Milwaukee Avenue. Functioning as Head Quarters for The Green Lantern Press, Sector 2337 will host three exhibitions a year, maintain a vibrant schedule of public programs, as well as a niche on-line bookstore and an in-store bookshelf specializing in contemporary art, poetry, theory, and independent press titles. By marrying these threads — contemporary exhibitions, readings, performances, poetry, and printed matter — we continue the spirit of The Green Lantern Gallery and Press, making community, culture, and discourse easily accessible to Chicago.

Mothernism in Chicago Magazine

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Mothernism

Lise Haller Baggesen got a great shout out in Jason Foumberg’s fall arts survival guide — he says:

4. Bring something to read.

For the cross-town bus ride in rush hour traffic, bring the new book on everyone’s reading list this month: Lise Haller Baggesen’s Mothernism. The Chicago-based artist’s collection of texts are presented as letters to women in Baggesen’s life. “At the intersection of feminism, science fiction, and disco, Mothernism aims to locate the mother-shaped hole in contemporary art discourse,” describes the book’s co-publishers, Green Lantern Press and Poor Farm.” read the whole list here.

It’ll be available for purchase at SPD some time this week —

and if you go here you can peek inside and check out some pages.